A kind of nuts may help overcome insomnia... The secret is in selenium!

30 September, 2022
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A kind of nuts may help overcome insomnia... The secret is in selenium!

Insomnia has become a common disorder that affects humans, as people who struggle to get enough sleep and good quality sleep are constantly increasing. There is no doubt that these disorders are related to a number of causes and factors, including psychological, mental and organic. However, studies have shown that a lack of some nutrients may play a key role in this regard.


In this regard, sleep expert Mary Grace Taylor, of Amerisleep, explained that while many struggle to get adequate sleep, seven to eight hours of sleep each night, there are a series of lifestyle choices that accumulate together and make us We suffer from fluctuations and sleep deprivation. 

"You probably know that staying away from caffeine in the few hours before bedtime can greatly increase your odds of getting a good night's sleep, but good sleep isn't just about avoiding the wrong foods or drinks. And certain foods can actually help you sleep better and prevent you from feeling anxious at night.”


Taylor recommended eating a handful of nuts, Brazil nuts, to help you sleep.


She said: "This is one of the best sources of selenium, a micronutrient that is lacking in sleep-deprived people. These nuts also contain minerals such as phosphorous and magnesium. Brazil nuts are especially beneficial for vegetarians, as most other selenium sources are animal-based.” She said: "This is one of the best sources of selenium, a micronutrient that is lacking in sleep-deprived people. These nuts also contain minerals such as phosphorous and magnesium. Brazil nuts are especially beneficial for vegetarians, as most other selenium sources are animal-based.”


The health advice website Healthline backs it up, saying, "Brazil nuts are one of the best sources of selenium. And one ounce, or about six to eight walnuts, contains about 544 micrograms of selenium.”


However, Taylor cautioned, "Be sure to eat a serving of Brazil nuts a few times a week to avoid selenium toxicity." The human body does not need excessive amounts of selenium, as for the average adult, it only requires about 55 micrograms per day. While pregnant women need between 60 and 70 micrograms of selenium.


In addition to aiding sleep, selenium has other healthy properties. It can help with DNA synthesis, reproduction and metabolism of thyroid hormone, and protect against infection.


Other sources of selenium include oysters, beef, turkey, fortified cereals, wholemeal bread, beans, lentils and eggs.


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