Can humans locate locations via echo?

23 June, 2022
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Can humans locate locations via echo?

With enough training, most humans can learn "echolocation" by using their tongues to make clicking sounds and analyzing the echoes that bounce off the surrounding environment, according to a study published by Science Alert.

In less than 10 weeks, the researchers were able to teach participants how to overcome obstacles and recognize the size and direction of objects using "bounce calls from their clicks." The experiment involved 12 people diagnosed as blind during their childhood, and 14 sighted.

Echolocation is seen as a "skill of animals such as bats and whales," but some blind humans also use their echoes to detect obstacles, according to Springer Link. No matter how useful this skill is, very few blind people learn how to do it, and the study came to prove that all that was required was a simple training schedule, according to Science Alert.

Psychologist Laure Thaler, from Britain's University of Durham, said that click-based echolocation training had a positive effect on participants' mobility and independence, according to the Medical Express website. Over the course of 20 training sessions, each lasting about two or three hours, the researchers found that blind and sighted participants, old and young, showed significant progress in click-based echolocation.

In the last two sessions, participants' new navigation skills were tested in a virtual maze they had never dealt with before, and the study showed that there were fewer collisions than at the start of the program.


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