Food that helps get rid of harmful fats associated with fatal diseases

29 September, 2022
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Food that helps get rid of harmful fats associated with fatal diseases

There is no doubt that the fat that accumulates in the body is what leads to weight gain and hinders the appearance of the slim figure that most people yearn for. However, the fat that accumulates around the waist is known as stubborn fat, because it is difficult to get rid of. Beyond form, “visceral fat” is considered dangerous, as it hides inside the stomach, and encases essential organs such as the liver, pancreas, and intestines.


This precise location means that the accumulation of this visceral fat may lead to serious health complications, including heart disease and diabetes. It is no secret that food is one of the main causes of these hidden fats, but the good news is that it may also be the "antidote". Whether you prefer them scrambled, boiled, or fried, eggs can do more than make for a hearty breakfast. According to a new study, published in Clinical Nutrition, a certain amount of this food can be "capable" in this area.


Looking at 355 college students between the ages of 18 and 30, researchers found that eating eggs significantly reduced body fat mass, BMI and waist circumference. Waist circumference is one marker of the amount of visceral fat, according to Science Direct.


Fat-reduction effects have been associated with high egg consumption, so one boiled egg may not be enough. The researchers found that the optimal amount associated with reduced fat intake was about 5 eggs per week. When it comes to the active ingredient in eggs, the analysis found that these benefits may come from the protein. While this study was observational, it was not the first to link eggs to weight loss. Protein is the cornerstone of a weight loss regimen, as the body breaks it down slowly.


This means that eating foods packed with protein makes a person feel fuller for longer by fighting hunger and increasing the level of satiety hormones, according to The National Library of Medicine.


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