With temperatures rise,be aware of cold water

15 August, 2022
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With temperatures rise,be aware of cold water

In the summer and with rising temperatures, many people resort to drinking iced water a lot, believing that it is a great way to beat the hot weather, although this can cause many damages to your health, and may cause you to faint.


It's easy to get overheated because of the record temperatures we've seen across the tri-state, says Dr. Evansville, David Schultz, and people with heat exhaustion should consider drinking water close to room temperature. "Cold ice water enters the esophagus and stomach, and there are nerves along the esophagus and stomach known as vagus nerves," Dr. Schultz explains. "These nerves can fire, send a signal to the brain and actually cause an individual to faint and lose consciousness for a brief period."


During severe heat waves, we often resort to drinking cold water, in an attempt to lower our body temperature, but the story of the British young man Adam Schwab may make us quit this habit. 

While Adam was working during the heat wave in Britain, with a temperature of about 37 degrees Celsius, he decided to cool his body by drinking two bottles of ice water, in a cold air-conditioned car.


Adam said, in an awareness post he posted on “Facebook”: “I began to feel something strange, and strange spots appear on my body. I experienced severe nausea, and severe tingling in my hands and feet.”


Adam added: "I opened the door, and I fell and my father rushed to rescue me, as my body was subjected to a severe shock from the cold water." Commenting on what happened with Adam, Dr. Sarah Jarvis told The Sun: “If you drink something very cold, and very quickly, the cold on the roof of your mouth stimulates the nerves, and this in turn leads to a rapid contraction, and then expansion of the tiny blood vessels. in the sinuses.”


“The brain cuts off messages from these nerves, and once that happens, you usually get a sudden pain, which can make you feel dizzy,” she added, recommending avoiding drinking cold water during severe heat waves.


The best thing that one can do with high temperatures is to drink a few sips of cold water, knowing that water that is at room temperature is considered safer in these cases. Britain is gripped by a scorching heat wave, and next week will see rain, after weeks of droughts that made July the driest since 1935.


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